5 Easy Ways to Entertain Your Toddler at Home

I’m not only a freelancer; I’m also a stay at home mom to a two-year-old girl. I spend most of the day working, running errands and doing housework, but I also spend a few hours each day focused solely on her.

At this age, she can only concentrate on one thing for about 20 minutes so I’ve put together a bag of tricks to keep her entertained.

Here are some easy (and cheap!) ways that I entertain my toddler:

1) Creating artwork

Art projects are one of my favorite things to do with Norah. We color with crayons, markers, or colored pencils, paint with watercolors or fingerpaint, string macaroni, and glue things to paper. Pinterest is a great resource for cute art projects for toddlers. I’ve put together some of my favorites projects here.

2) Playing outside

Unless it’s the dead of winter, Norah and I go outside every day for at least 30 minutes. We walk around the yard looking for sticks and leaves. We take short walks around the neighborhood. We play with her outdoor toys (water table, sandbox, jungle gym). We are lucky to have a large yard, but even in our previous home we spent time on the stoop getting some fresh air and watching the cars go by.

3) Flashcards and letters

We spend 20-30 minutes per day doing flashcards and letter games. During the back-to-school season, I found a bunch of $1 flashcard sets at Target. I bought Cat in the Hat cards for shapes and colors and a deck of animal cards. We also have a few letter puzzles that spell out small words like cat, moon, and hat. We love this Melissa and Doug See and Spell puzzle set.

4) Reading

Since Norah was about three months old, I’ve taken her to the library every week and read to her for at least 20 minutes per day. Thanks to this, she absolutely loves books and will now spend 20-30 minutes sitting in her rocking chair “reading” her books to herself. Her most often requested items are a book and one of her stuffies to read it to. Our local library has a goal of reading 1000 books to your child before they enter kindergarten. If you read just one per night, you’ll read 365 in one year, 730 in two years and 1,095 in three years. You can find out more about this program here.

5) Games with household items

I set up inexpensive or free games for Norah to play in the house. Some examples of these include:

  • Homemade obstacle course

One of the easiest and cheapest things to do is set up an obstacle course in your home. I use couch cushions, pillows, moving boxes, and a hula hoop for obstacles and washi tape or painter’s tape to create lines and zig zags on the carpet for Norah to follow. This has been especially helpful in improving her motor skills.

  • Hide and seek

We play hide and seek by me hiding and her finding me (contained to one level of the house) or hiding her stuffed animals and telling her to find them. The stuffed animal hide and seek usually holds her attention longer because they are harder to find.

  • Scavenger hunt

This is the same concept as hide and seek, but we look for specific things. I’ll hide seashells, an apple, a few leafs, and some toys around the house and then give her a list of what she’s looking for. She can’t read yet, but she likes to cross things off the list with a crayon when she finds them.

  • Money sort

I have a giant jar of coins that she likes to transfer from one container to another. This activity requires supervision because coins are choking hazards. Norah almost never puts non-food items in her mouth, but I still watch her when she plays this game. This is a good activity for her to do in the kitchen while I’m cooking dinner. I’ve also done this with uncooked macaroni noodles.

  • Cup stack

I have 50+ plastic Solo cups in different colors from her previous birthday and holiday parties that she likes to stack. She’ll spend 20-30 minutes stacking them and knocking them over in the kitchen. She also likes doing this with plastic plates.

  • Tupperware drums

Playing drums on pots and pans is way too loud, but Tupperware drums are a great alternative. The noise isn’t deafening so your kid gets the satisfaction of hitting a spoon onto something and making noise without giving you a headache.

A game that I’m not including on the list, but Norah always wants to play is called “blankiehead.” She puts her blanket over her face and runs at full speed around the house. I do not recommend this game!

Entertaining a toddler does not have to expensive or exhausting. The most important part is being present with your child and actively engaging in whatever activity you choose to do together.


Mama’s Favorites: This Week’s Best Content (Week of 10/17/16)

This is a weekly collection of content that I found valuable, interesting, entertaining – or all three! Topics mostly center on freelancing, marketing, and parenting with occasional wild cards thrown in. If you like what I’m sharing, follow me on Twitter for more content suggestions.


These illustrations of people who want you to work for free are hilarious. The quotes were taken from real people seeking free work from artists.

Alex Honeysett has some great advice on how to pitch a guest post. Researching the place you’re pitching and catering your proposal to their specifications are two of the suggestions that I fully support.

Stephane Kasriel takes the information from the recent Freelancing in America survey and proposes the three things that freelancers need from the next administration. He suggests that the government study freelancers before proposing any new legislation that affects them.


Brittany Berger put together an awesome comprehensive guide to time management systems. If you need to get organized, check out this post!

Alex Mathers discusses how creatives are using social media to gain clients. I’ve found that Facebook groups are a great place to get leads.

Daniel Newman forecasts marketing trends for 2017. Trends include more and better quality video and personalized everything.


If you’re looking for a gift for the one-year old in your life, check out this list. Norah got the Beatbo robot for Christmas last year and she’s still obsessed with it.

This article talks about which children are most affected by parenting style. According to Drake Baer, children who have “negative emotionality — the precursor to neuroticism” are the most susceptible to being really hurt by angry and neglectful parenting.


4 Major Takeaways from the 2016 Freelancing in America Survey

Upwork and Freelancers Union recently released the results of their 2016 Freelancing in America survey. This was the third year they’ve interviewed 6,000 workers about the state of freelancing.

Here are the four major takeaways from this year’s survey:

1) Freelancing is growing fast

This year, 55 million workers identified as freelancers. Freelancers make up 35% of the working population! The number of freelancers increased by 2 million in the last 2 years. At this rate, we can expect around 60 million freelancers by the end of the decade.

Where are they finding clients?

Half of the freelancers polled find jobs online with 50% finding clients within three days of searching. Two-thirds say that the portion of work they found online increased from last year. Most freelancers agreed that having a diverse portfolio of clients was better than having one large client.

2) Freelancers are making good money

This year freelancing contributed an estimated $1 trillion dollars to the economy!

This number was boosted by an uptick in client work. In fact, half of the freelancers polled saw increased demand for their services in the past year. These freelancers also expect their income to increase from 2015.

Incomes are increasing because freelancers are starting to charge what they’re worth. Nearly half of the freelancers raised their rates in the past year and more than half plan to raise them next year.

Are full-time workers doing better income-wise?

Not really. The majority of freelancers who left a full-time job reported they were making more than their previous salary within a year.

3) Freelancing is more attractive than a traditional job

This year, 63% of freelancers say they started by choice instead of necessity, up from 54% in 2014. Freelancing is moving away from being something that you do between jobs and becoming something that you choose as a career.

A majority of people, 79%, said that freelancing was more enjoyable than their previous jobs. The reasons cited were greater flexibility and freedom. Full-time freelancers report feeling engaged, respected, accomplished, empowered and free.

Freelancers didn’t have to put in as much time as full-time workers to feel those benefits; most freelancers only worked 36 hours per week and reported that they had enough client work.

Half of freelancers polled said there was no amount of money that would make them go back to a traditional job.

4) Freelancing is becoming more widely accepted

63% of respondents felt that the attitude around freelancing as a career was becoming more positive and 84% of freelancers think the best days are ahead.

What does all this mean for the future of freelancing?

A continued shift in the perception of freelancing is a great thing for freelancers! The more mainstream freelancing becomes the more companies and entrepreneurs will be willing to work with freelancers. In addition, the more rights freelancers can hope to be granted in future legislation.

Freelancing is experiencing a golden age. The conditions are perfect to succeed on your own terms as a freelancer.

If you’re interested in getting started, check out my post on what you need to know about making the leap into freelancing.


Mama’s Favorites: This Week’s Best Content (Week of 10/10/16)

This is a weekly collection of content that I found valuable, interesting, entertaining – or all three! Topics mostly center on freelancing, marketing, and parenting with occasional wild cards thrown in. If you like what I’m sharing, follow me on Twitter for more content suggestions.


Jason Zook discusses how he got over his fear of writing. Some tips include getting vulnerable, making writing a daily practice, and always sharing something useful.

Brent Jones talks about how he pitched 88 clients in one day. This article motivated me to set a goal of pitching 2-3 new clients per week.

This article on taking the reins in your freelance business is great for those just getting started. Nellie Akalp lays out a plan for getting your business in order.


Jon Westenberg offers some quick and dirty tips on increasing your website’s traffic. Of course,  learning SEO is one of the most important suggestions.

John Hall talks about the most important factor in PR and marketing and no surprise, it’s trust. I particularly liked the part about customers being extra sensitive to “me” focused marketing.

This short article talks about brands’ top marketing priorities over the past few years. SEO is ranked #1 and blog content is #2.


How does parents’ smartphone usage affect their kids? Parents can feel pulled in all directions and kids can feel ignored. This article suggests setting limits on screen time.

Interesting article on how a child’s intelligence develops. I learned that some portion of intelligence is determined in utero by hormones in the mother!

Guest Posts

I’m proud to announce my first ever guest post on The Write Life. I talked about how I wrote for 30 minutes every day in September. I plan to write for 30 minutes every day until the end of the year then for all of 2017! My next update will be in another ~20 days when I complete a 60 day streak.


My Favorite Blogging Resources

There are many tools that can take your blogging game to the next level. And the good news is, most of these tools are free and easy to use! During my time freelancing, I’ve found some great resources to support my writing process. Here are some of the apps and websites I use for blogging.


To help me concentrate while I write blogs, I use Brain.fm. The app plays ambient music that’s formulated to help you focus. They also have music to help you relax and sleep. I’ve found a huge increase in productivity while using the app.

I use Self Control for Mac to block distracting websites for blocks of time while I work. This usually includes Facebook and Reddit. I block them for portions of the day so I don’t end up checking them repeatedly while I work.


There are many places where you can write your blog entries. You can write directly in a blogging platform like WordPress or Medium. Doing this gives you the convenience of having your blog posts all in one place, but adds the distraction of being online and able to click around your site.

Another option is writing in Word or Pages and disconnecting your internet access while doing so. It’s rumored that novelist Johnathan Franzen writes all of his books on a computer with no internet access to avoid the possibility of distraction.

I write all of my blogs in Google Docs. I prefer this platform because the layout is plain and doesn’t distract me. It updates every few seconds so I never have to worry about whether my work will be lost. In addition, should I want someone to read over one of my posts before publishing, I can easily share the Google Doc.

I also use the free tool Grammarly for Chrome. This is similar to spell check where it underlines words that are spelled wrong or grammatically incorrect. Although I have a degree in English, I don’t always remember every single grammar rule – there are a lot! I had to complete an entire course on grammar to receive my degree and it was one of the hardest classes I took.


There are many free stock images sites out there. My favorite is Librestock which searches 47 free stock image websites. This is where I find all of the images that I use on my blog.

When I need to create an image or add some text to an existing image, I use Canva. I’ve been using Canva for 2+ years and I love it. Eventually, I’d like to learn how to use Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, but until then Canva does a great job for my current needs. Both of these resources offer basic functionality with a free account.

Once I post a blog, I use other tools to promote it which I’ll discuss in a future post.

The most important thing about writing a post is actually sitting down and doing it. Remember, BICHOK is the key to writing – Butt in Chair, Hands on Keyboard. If you spend enough time writing eventually you’ll produce something useful, entertaining, or interesting.


Mama’s Favorites: This Week’s Best Content (Week of 10/3/16)

This is a weekly collection of content that I found valuable, interesting, entertaining – or all three! Topics mostly center on freelancing, marketing, and parenting with occasional wild cards thrown in. If you like what I’m sharing, follow me on Twitter for more content suggestions.


Caroline Beaton discusses her journey from full-time employee to full-time freelancer. She made a series of smart, strategic moves to ensure that she could always support herself.

Ryan Robinson shares his tips on how to write an effective pitch for a freelancing client. These suggestions secured him a $500 per post gig!

Julio Vincent Gambuto wants you to be a freelancer who actually makes money. He has some fantastic ideas for how to stay lucrative.


Your customer has 30 different needs, does your product or service meet them? Larry Kim talks about the attributes driving customer purchases. Which ones can you tap into?

Email marketing has many benefits including boosting your website’s SEO. Jayson DeMers explains how regular email communication can improve your rankings.

Kevan Lee walks through the process of getting verified on Twitter. A verified account can boost the perception of your online presence, but you need to be a somewhat public figure to be approved.


A round-up of 45 hilarious “parenting tips” ‘from Twitter. “Never take a toddler’s word for it” was one of my favorites.

How do Jewish mothers approach parenthood? The Chicago Tribune has four suggestions and I love the one about encouraging geekiness.


Cat Noone talks about how she got started hand-lettering. This is a skill I plan on learning.



What I’ve Learned from Two Years of Working at Home

This August was my second anniversary of working from home. I left my job as an Information Specialist in a biotechnology company’s corporate library in 2014 after the birth of my daughter and began working at Zirtual as a virtual assistant. After six months there, I left to start my own marketing company. Now I mostly work as a marketing specialist, but I also do some virtual assistant work and contract work with my former biotechnology employer.

I’ve learned a lot while working from home. Some days are great and others are not, but I could say the same thing about a traditional job. Here are the most important things I’ve learned from working from home for the past two years.

  • Organization is king

In my previous job, I was used to having systems in place. We had a metric board where we kept track of weekly projects and a daily stand-up meeting to discuss outstanding work. I took those skills to my own business and set up schedules and an organization system.

I track all of my projects in Wunderlist and Asana. Most of my clients are in Wunderlist. When someone assigns me a task, I add it to their list with the agreed upon deadline. Personal work, like this blog and The Sturm Agency website, is in Asana. I like both platforms for different reasons. Wunderlist is perfect for client’s work because it’s simple and easy to use. However, I also love Asana’s interface and prefer to keep my personal work organized there.

I timeblock my Google calendar. My calendar is blocked off during my working hours (6-9 am, 12-2 pm, 7-9 pm, and some time on the weekends). Each day I check my client’s requests and work on them for roughly one hour per day except for a client who has a time-based agreement with me. Timeblocking allows me to check in with each client Monday through Friday. Having things set up this way ensures that I never neglect a client for a few days and come back to missed projects or admin tasks. Sometimes the client won’t have anything for me to to do so I’ll move on to the next person. I started this system when I was working full time at Zirtual and managing 8-10 clients. I don’t have that many clients anymore, but the system still works.

I write a daily to-do list in my notebook each day. Every morning I go into Wunderlist and Asana, check which tasks I need to get done that day, and write a to-do list in a paper notebook. I like doing this because crossing things off a list gives me a sense of satisfaction that clicking a button doesn’t. I only write down the five or six most important tasks for the day. I can’t get more than that done on a given day and seeing a 20+ item list stresses me out.

I check what I accomplished and what’s outstanding each evening. Before I go to bed, I check what needs to be done the next day and review the list of things I accomplished that day. Before doing this, I was having a hard time falling asleep because I was running through my to-do list over and over in my mind. Reading a list of my daily achievements makes me feel like I accomplished something even on my worst days. This five-minute routine has helped me fall asleep more quickly.

I track all of my time in 17hats and Toggl. For clients that I invoice, I use 17hats. For everyone else, I track in Toggl. I even track the time I spend writing this blog. It helps because I have a visual guide that I can review at the end of the week.

  • Take a day off

During my first year freelancing, I worked seven days a week. I still have not taken a proper vacation where I stop client work for a week.

That said, I need to have one day off per week that does not involve doing work for anyone else. That doesn’t mean I don’t work on my personal projects, set up my social media feeds or write blogs, it just means that I don’t work on anyone else’s stuff. Every night, it’s my goal to stop computer work an hour before I go to bed so I can read books and relax.

Typically, I don’t work on Saturdays at all. We spend time together as a family during the day. In the evening, my husband and I rent a movie or watch one of our shows.

  • Your word is gold

Some people have a negative perception of freelancers or those who work from home. They think that remote workers are spending their days watching TV and napping. There’s even a Kraft Macaroni and Cheese commercial which mentions “working from home fakers.” Unfortunately, I’ve found that there are some freelancers who are flaky and unreachable. I’ve had to work with some web designers who took 3-4 emails about the same topic before they’d respond. I recently had another marketing specialist completely blow me off after hiring me to do some work.

I do what I say I’m going to do. I work hard to make sure that I meet all deadlines and deliver what I’ve promised. One of the biggest keys to doing that is setting realistic deadlines. I try not to let other people set deadlines for me.

I’m completely open about working at home with my daughter, but I want clients to forget that I’m also taking care of a child. I strive to be so responsive and consistent that it seems like freelancing is the only thing I’m doing.

  • Choose the right clients

One of the best things about being a freelancer is that I can choose my own clients. I try to find people that I believe I can help. I find people whose business sounds interesting to me or whose mission and vision I agree with. I like to work in areas where I already have some knowledge.

I like working with other small business owners, entrepreneurs, and freelancers.

That’s also why working with nonprofits is so important to me. I want to spread their message and make sure the community is aware of the good things they are doing. We need more positivity in our lives especially where I live in Rockford, Illinois which was ranked the 3rd most miserable place to live in the United States.

My ideal client is someone who is organized and realistic. I need someone who has a clear vision for what they want me to do. I also appreciate people who are quick to say thank you and slow to criticize.

  • Stay grateful

I have blessings on blessings; there is no hint of sarcasm when I say that. I think some of my success has to do with the fact that I am so grateful to be able to do this. I don’t personally know anyone else doing something like this. I know a few people with their own businesses, but they are brick and mortar operations or businesses selling actual goods (photos, invites, etc.) I live in a small town and the idea of “working on the internet” is not commonplace.

Many days I’m amazed that I’ve come this far and am so appreciative of my clients. I have the attitude of I get to do this instead of I have to do this.


Mama’s Favorites: This Week’s Best Content (Week of 9/26/16)

This is a weekly collection of content that I found valuable, interesting, entertaining – or all three! Topics mostly center on freelancing, marketing, and parenting with occasional wild cards thrown in. If you like what I’m sharing, follow me on Twitter for more content suggestions.


Ali Luke shares six ways to make time to write when you’re a parent. I love her idea about writing in blocks. I also structure my day this way.

Josh Hoffman suggests a ‘Networking of Life’ method for getting new freelancing clients. It involves interacting in the community and staying relevant in people’s minds.

Johnathan Stark doubled his income by switching from hourly billing to value-based pricing. Seasoned workers are rewarded in a value-based system while inefficient workers are rewarded with an hourly structure. I currently have a mix of hourly and value based clients.


The value of side projects cannot be underestimated. Lauren Holliday talks about 11 ways you can generate income for your business by providing solutions for your customers.

If your content isn’t working, check out this article by Mike Templeman to find out why. You may not be saying anything new or people may not be able to find your content. If you find the source of the problem, you can fix it.


Miriam Mason Martineau shares a heartfelt post about why you have to let go of your ego to parent. Some suggestions include focusing on presence and self-awareness and trusting yourself.


Daytime Potty Training Using the Oh Crap! Method

Because I’m an overachiever and my daughter is very verbal and showed interest, I started potty training her in April at 22 months old. It was actually common for parents of the previous generation to potty train around 18 months! For millennial moms, this may seem a bit early because the current trend is training around two years old. Each child is different and although you should wait to see signs of readiness, you should also give it a try when you are ready to put in the work.

I used the book Oh Crap! Potty Training: Everything Modern Parents Need to Know to Do It Once and Do It Right by Jamie Glowacki to daytime potty train my daughter.

The Oh Crap! method offers two options, you can tackle day and night time potty training in one swoop or you can separate the two. Since I don’t like my sleep messed with, I decided to start with daytime potty training. This decision was also influenced by my pregnancy. I thought that I would tackle nighttime training in December when I would be up with a newborn anyway. Although there won’t be a newborn in December, I will still be tackling night time training after Norah transitions to her toddler bed.

The Oh Crap! method starts with getting the child to recognize when they are going to the bathroom. There are six stages in the process:

  1. Peeing and pooping while naked, either with prompting or without
  2. Peeing and pooping with clothes on, commando, with prompting or without
  3. Peeing and pooping in different situations, with prompting or without
  4. Peeing and pooping with underpants, with prompting or without
  5. Consistent self-initiation
  6. Night and nap (unless you do it all at once)

On the first day, we kept Norah naked from the waist down (per the books recommendation). We bought three inexpensive Summer Infant potties for $9 each. We keep one in the bathroom upstairs, one downstairs, and one in the back of my car. As Norah went about her normal day, she would notice that she was peeing. The first time it happened she stopped what she was doing and stared off into the distance. We immediately grabbed her and said in an upbeat voice  “We go pee in the potty” while carrying her to the potty. By the time she reached the potty, she was done. By the second or third time that day, she was saying “Uh oh pee pee” or otherwise indicating that she knew she had started going.

The first day she also pooped on the carpet without much fanfare.

Note: I kept a Bissel spot cleaner in the living room to clean up messes as soon as they happened.

We started this process on a Saturday so we’d both be home during the first two days. Sunday proceeded much like Saturday, but Norah showed more awareness of what she was doing.

We did not go anywhere or do anything besides potty training for the entire weekend. We kept her contained to one room and one of us had our eyes on her the entire day. It was absolutely exhausting! Even though I take care of my daughter every day, I don’t have my eyes fixed on her nonstop.

After several days, she began going on the potty with more regularity. We took her to the potty as soon as she woke up in the morning and every two hours during the day. We had her sit on the potty before we got into the car and immediately when we arrived at our destination.

She was able to transition to the next stage – being fully dressed – by day five. She had many accidents during the first 5-7 days. Around the one week mark, something seemed to click and she was able to hold it while telling us she had to go. We also became aware of her “potty tells” which are stopping what she’s doing, standing completely still, and staring off into the distance. Whenever we saw those signs, we’d rush her to the potty.

We also had her go commando (no underwear) for three weeks per the book’s recommendation. Jamie’s hypothesis is that tight underwear feel too similar to diapers and the child will have more accidents if you introduce them too soon after taking away diapers. When we introduced underwear during the third week, there was an uptick in accidents for a few days.

Norah has been daytime potty trained for about six months now. She rarely has accidents, but does not like to poop in the potty. She will often hold it until her nap or bedtime. There is an entire section in the book that I need to revisit that discusses what to do in that situation. As of right now I’m not worried about it because I still need to tackle nighttime training. Most of the time when Norah has an accident, it’s our fault because we’re dragged her to several stores or went a few hours without bringing her to the potty. She is also much more likely to have an accident if she’s engrossed in something like a TV show or game.

A few tips for tackling potty training:

  1. Choose a method and be consistent

I chose the Oh Crap! method because I liked the humor of the book and that the method is a “no rewards” strategy. I did not want to use treats, toys, or stickers to motivate my child to go the bathroom for a few reasons:

  • I didn’t think I would always have those things handy
  • I didn’t want to associate food as ‘reward’
  • I didn’t want to reward biologically necessary behavior
  • I didn’t want to get into a heated negotiation about how many things she could have.

If rewards sound good to you or you think your child would do better with incentive then you should choose a method that includes them.

All in all, I doubt it matters which method you choose, but it does matter how consistent you are. Potty training will eat up an entire weekend so don’t try to do it when you have other plans, don’t feel well, or aren’t up for it. It’s an exhausting weekend and you only want to have to do it once. You don’t want to give up on day two, only to start from scratch a few months later.

2) Talk it up and make it fun

Norah loves books so we made sure to borrow as many potty books as we could in the weeks before we start training. We’d talk to her about how fun it was going to be and what a big girl she was. We let her pick out underwear and the color of her potties. We talked to her about how everyone and everything goes poop and pee. We tried to make the process as fun as possible because she initially showed some fear of the toilet.

3) Stay positive

Potty training can be very stressful and tiring. Keep in mind that it’s a slow process and there will be many accidents. Look for progress and not perfection. The first time Norah went on the floor there was no recognition that she was even going. By the second or third time, she was looking down at the mess and by later the same day she was saying “Uh oh.” No matter what timeline your child is on, it’s pretty incredible that they can grasp the concept within a few days. Stay positive and focus on the progression towards the goal instead of how much urine is soaking into your carpet.

Once the process is over, hopefully you’ll never have to do it again…until the next child.


Mama’s Favorites: This Week’s Best Content (Week of 9/19/16)

This is a weekly collection of content that I found valuable, interesting, entertaining – or all three! Topics mostly center on freelancing, marketing, and parenting with occasional wild cards thrown in. If you like what I’m sharing, follow me on Twitter for more content suggestions.


One of my favorite writers, Jeff Goins, shares eight steps you need to take to write a book. These suggestions were helpful for the ebook on virtual assistance I’m writing now. If you have any desire to write a book, check this out.

Jeff Hoffman thinks that freelancers shouldn’t create a niche. I agree! I have an article in the works for November about being a generalist.

Robert Williams says getting hired as a freelancer comes down to trust. He has some great suggestions on how to appear more trustworthy on your website. I love his idea about including more testimonials!


It’s the season of trend pieces like this one on 10 social media marketing trends for 2017. Jeff Bullas talks about the rise of live streaming video, chatbots, and more. One of my favorite things about fall is reading the predictions for next year.

Lindsey at Six Leaf Design has five simple tips to keep in mind while designing a logo. Her suggestions are spot on and her logos are fantastic.

Influencer marketing continues to gain traction in the online space. John Bohan talks about how to ensure your campaign is successful.


Nicole Miller from Buffer talks about being the first person who had a baby while working there. She’s very honest about the changes in her career since her baby arrived. It’s so great to see a piece from the perspective of a work-at-home mom because our voices are not heard often enough!

Getting dirty, exploring things and getting scraped up was part of my childhood. A playground in NYC tries to get back to a simpler time…before helicopter parents.